When you’re selling your home, it makes sense that you want someone at the showing to represent you and your home. They can answer questions and provide feedback. But if you really want to sell your home, once the price is set and your home is staged, there’s something else you really need to do instead.

Get the listing agent out of the house for showings. 

Buyer, Interrupted

I was recently showing homes in Twin Eagles, a beautiful golf community. Our buyer was looking for a specific layout in a home so he could have a good place for his antique piano and perform music for his friends and guests. During our time at the listing, the listing agent was also there. The agent didn’t know the buyer, his needs, or his purpose for buying a home in the first place. And the agent was a total distraction during the showing.

As we stood in an entryway to this gorgeous home, the buyer tried to take it all in and visualize his piano and his guests. This was his moment to imagine himself in the home. And off to the side, the listing agent talked nonstop about recent upgrades, the air conditioner, the patio, you name it. It was the absolute worst time to cause a distraction. If you want an offer to be made and a home to sell, the last thing you should do is interrupt a buyer while they’re imagining themselves in that home.

Emotions vs. Facts

Real estate is a very emotional purchase. The property itself is secondary. Buyers make a decision based on the experience and the lifestyle they believe they’ll have in the home. If they can envision themselves living there, they’ll sign on the dotted line. Not before. At that very moment of imagining and decision-making, words from any agent, listing or showing, are completely unnecessary and ineffective.

Most buyers look at more than one home. It’s too easy for a buyer to lose interest in the perfect property because they became distracted. A listing agent more interested in discussing the features than allowing the buyer time to shop can and will cause more harm than good. Fortunately, we were able to convince the buyer to come back for a second showing without the listing agent present. He looked around, imagined himself, his piano, and his guests in the property, and he bought the home. 

Not every situation ends this way. Too often, a buyer doesn’t finish their process, gets distracted by the noise, and moves on to another home. As a seller wanting someone to advocate for your home sounds like sense, but it can be what kills the deal. Stage your home, set the right price, and work with an agent who knows how to effectively market your home. After that, allow the buyer to look and think without interference from distraction and noise.

Whether you’re a buyer or a seller, we can help you buy and sell. Let’s talk!